Beyond Standing Rock

he Museum of Indian Arts & Culture (MIAC)  is pleased to present its latest exhibition opening in Feb. 23 to Oct. 27, 2019, Beyond Standing Rock. The exhibition takes a look at one of the most widespread grassroots movements in recent history, highlighting works created at the protest by Native and non-Native artists. O

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Erasure Native American Genocide: A Legacy

RASURE: Native American Genocide: A Legacy opens February 15 at 7 p.m. with a reception at ReflectSpace Gallery at the Downtown Central Library in Glendale. The exhibit presents work by indigenous artists aiming to reclaim and redefine Indian history using their own narratives, bringing erasure to light through brazen political imagery, subtle constructions, and work that upends ubiquitous Indian stereotypes. Now open in Glendale, California.

Contemporary Traces of Ancient Land Exhibition

Contemporary Traces on Ancient Land February 9 - April 21 Contemporary Traces on Ancient Land features the work of Merecedes Dorame, Catherine Herrera, Pamela J. Peters, Cara Romero, and Hulleah Tsinhnahjinnie. These artists explore contemporary native identities looking at the historical impact of colonialism and its current manifestations that have impacted their communities’ connections to culture, traditions, and... Continue Reading →

NDNZ in The City

I'll be speaking about my photography work at the Los Angeles Central Library. Date(s): Wednesday, February 20, 2019 Time: 12:15pm Location: Central Library Meeting Room A Audience: Adults, Seniors, Teens Category: Lecture RSVP: Reservations not required. Limited seating is first come, first serve. Doors open approximately 15 minutes before the start of the program. Description: PAMELA J.... Continue Reading →

Feminist Crush – Blog interview

Pamela J. Peters is an Indigenous multimedia documentarian from the Navajo Reservation. Her multimedia work, which she call "Indigenous Realism", explores the lives and diversities of real American Indians and pushes viewers to critically analyze the psychological and historical structures of Native Americans in mass media.

Native Women’s voice through Poetry!

Los Angeles is home of the largest American Indian population in the country. In recognition of the city’s immense tribal diversity, artist and filmmaker Pamela J. Peters (Navajo) brings together four renowned Native American women for an evening of poetry and spoken word. Pulling from the land, language, and traditional life of the contemporary Native American, each poet illuminates what it means to be a Native woman writer today. Alongside Peters, participating poets are Tazbah Rose Chavez (Nüümü, Diné and Apache), Emily Clarke (Cahuilla), Kinsale Hueston (Navajo), and Allison Ramirez (Tohono O’odham).

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