Saad Nizhóní (Beautiful Words)

Saad Nizhóní (Beautiful Words) Thursday, July 16, and Thursday, July 23, 2020, 6:00 p.m. I am hosting a poetry event with Navajo poets via Zoom. Join the Autry and Navajo multimedia documentarian Pamela J. Peters as she introduces two evenings featuring remarkable Navajo poets whose beautiful words integrate Diné history, language, and culture. This Zoom event … Continue reading Saad Nizhóní (Beautiful Words)

Myrton Running Wolf’s interview on acting and his quest for participation and visibility for American Indians in Hollywood.

Myrton Running Wolf received praise for his latest short film Soldier. Inspired by true accounts, the story follows two young Lakota sisters — escapees of 1890 Wounded Knee Massacre — as they fight to survive against the U.S. military. Rarely seen in Hollywood, the movie provides a unique perspective of historical American Indian events through a dynamic Native … Continue reading Myrton Running Wolf’s interview on acting and his quest for participation and visibility for American Indians in Hollywood.

Diné Pride “We Are Sacred” Diyingo ‘Adaanitsíískéés

As we concluded the month of June and the last of Pride celebrations for the month, I decided to take a road trip back to my tribal reservation to cover and document the third annual Diné Pride. The Navajo Nation is the largest sovereign tribal reservation in the United States. I grew up on my reservation, and have … Continue reading Diné Pride “We Are Sacred” Diyingo ‘Adaanitsíískéés

Kimberly Norris Guerrero: The Native American Actress You Need To Know

Kimberly Norris Guerrero is a name I became familiar with after I first saw her in an episode of Seinfeld. Her character Winona, an alluring, confident intelligent young woman stood up against subtle American Indian stereotypes in a humorous refined way. Years later, I attended the Autry’s Native Voices theater production, The Frybread Queen, after which I met … Continue reading Kimberly Norris Guerrero: The Native American Actress You Need To Know

Beyond Standing Rock

he Museum of Indian Arts & Culture (MIAC)  is pleased to present its latest exhibition opening in Feb. 23 to Oct. 27, 2019, Beyond Standing Rock. The exhibition takes a look at one of the most widespread grassroots movements in recent history, highlighting works created at the protest by Native and non-Native artists. O

Erasure Native American Genocide: A Legacy

RASURE: Native American Genocide: A Legacy opens February 15 at 7 p.m. with a reception at ReflectSpace Gallery at the Downtown Central Library in Glendale.

The exhibit presents work by indigenous artists aiming to reclaim and redefine Indian history using their own narratives, bringing erasure to light through brazen political imagery, subtle constructions, and work that upends ubiquitous Indian stereotypes. Now open in Glendale, California.

Contemporary Traces of Ancient Land Exhibition

Contemporary Traces on Ancient Land February 9 – April 21 Contemporary Traces on Ancient Land features the work of Merecedes Dorame, Catherine Herrera, Pamela J. Peters, Cara Romero, and Hulleah Tsinhnahjinnie. These artists explore contemporary native identities looking at the historical impact of colonialism and its current manifestations that have impacted their communities’ connections to culture, traditions, and … Continue reading Contemporary Traces of Ancient Land Exhibition

NDNZ in The City

I’ll be speaking about my photography work at the Los Angeles Central Library. Date(s): Wednesday, February 20, 2019 Time: 12:15pm Location: Central Library Meeting Room A Audience: Adults, Seniors, Teens Category: Lecture RSVP: Reservations not required. Limited seating is first come, first serve. Doors open approximately 15 minutes before the start of the program. Description: PAMELA J. … Continue reading NDNZ in The City

Navajo Transgender Women’s Journey of Acceptance in Society

The Navajo Nation, spanning over the states of New Mexico, Arizona and Utah, is the largest Tribal reservation in the United States, with one of the largest populations of tribal members residing on reservation lands. The Navajo people have maintained their traditional ways despite the encroachments of colonialism and Christianity into their culture, but it’s … Continue reading Navajo Transgender Women’s Journey of Acceptance in Society

Getting to know Los Angeles Tongva Actress — Tonantzin Carmelo

After landing the lead Thunder Heart Woman role in Steven Spielberg’s TNT’s Emmy and Golden Globes-winning epic miniseries Into the West, Tonantzin’s career as an actress emerged. Today she has starred in more than 28 films (IMDB source), and serves as a mentor for the Los Angeles-based theater group Native Voices at The Autry, where … Continue reading Getting to know Los Angeles Tongva Actress — Tonantzin Carmelo

Feminist Crush – Blog interview

Pamela J. Peters is an Indigenous multimedia documentarian from the Navajo Reservation. Her multimedia work, which she call “Indigenous Realism”, explores the lives and diversities of real American Indians and pushes viewers to critically analyze the psychological and historical structures of Native Americans in mass media.

Native Women’s Voices through Poetry

Originally posted on LRInspire:
Los Angeles is home of the largest American Indian population in the country. In recognition of the city’s immense tribal diversity, artist and filmmaker Pamela J. Peters (Navajo) brings together four renowned Native American women for an evening of poetry and spoken word. Pulling from the land, language, and traditional life…

Native Women’s voice through Poetry!

Los Angeles is home of the largest American Indian population in the country. In recognition of the city’s immense tribal diversity, artist and filmmaker Pamela J. Peters (Navajo) brings together four renowned Native American women for an evening of poetry and spoken word. Pulling from the land, language, and traditional life of the contemporary Native American, each poet illuminates what it means to be a Native woman writer today. Alongside Peters, participating poets are Tazbah Rose Chavez (Nüümü, Diné and Apache), Emily Clarke (Cahuilla), Kinsale Hueston (Navajo), and Allison Ramirez (Tohono O’odham).

“LEGACY OF EXILED NDNZ” AND THE FILM THAT INSPIRED MY WORK “The Exiles”

The Exiles (1961) In 2008, I first saw Kent Mackenzie’s film The Exiles (1961). It is a neorealist film that showcases a true depiction of American Indians living in Los Angeles at a time when nothing was documented and when Hollywood cinema was generating stereotypes of Natives in Western films. I loved The Exiles because it gave a realistic portrayal … Continue reading “LEGACY OF EXILED NDNZ” AND THE FILM THAT INSPIRED MY WORK “The Exiles”

Indigenous Peoples Day – Los Angeles

This is my new photography project #RepresentYourTribalNation to commemorate #IndigenousPeoplesDay in Los Angeles.  I want a larger audience to see us as contemporary natives in the city, but also see our tribal flags and the diversity that exists within a city like Los Angeles.

Union Station – Los Angeles

My love of this city is shown in the photographs I take.  One place in particular that I love is Union Station.  I love Union Station for two personal reasons. First, because it’s beautiful and has a deep history to Los Angeles that has been preserved since 1939.

The Oscars – where are the “American Indians?”

We all can make the collective consciousness to reimagine the way Indians are seen today and I do hope that our “participation” as Americans Indians will be part of the definition of “inclusion” in the Academy of Motion Pictures – soon!

My Once Life – Video Poem

My Once Life is a hybrid video poem about the continuing impact of colonization on tribal peoples.

NDNZ In The City

Join us Nov 2, 2016 for an evening of talk, short films, photographs, and personal stories from Indigenous multimedia documentarian, Pamela Peters (Navajo). The evening’s event will showcase Peter’s newest film Legacy of Exiled NDNZ and multimedia presentation Real NDNZ re-take Hollywood. Pamela’s work stands against prevalent stereotypes of American Indians in popular culture by pushing viewers to critically analyze the psychological and historical structures of Native American in mass media.

These Native American Artists Want You to Know They Are ‘Still Here’

“For so long, we’ve had other people tell our stories and document our stories. They’ve researched us so much they’ve forgotten we are human beings,” said Peters, who is Diné (Navajo). “It’s important for us to have our [own] narrative, to [define] exactly who we are as indigenous people.”

Real NDNZ Re-Take Hollywood

Real NDNZ Re-Take Hollywood, showcases photographs that disrupt and decolonize clichéd portrayals of the “Hollywood Indian.” The series “re-takes,” classic portraits of movie stars of yesteryear with contemporary Native American actors in Los Angeles.

Natives Americans in Los Angeles, CA

As a Navajo living in the city, I want our history to be remembered and acknowledge. We are part of Los Angeles History too!

1650 Gallery & Studio Photography

These two images were part of the of Girls Girls Girls photo exhibit in Los Angeles, California. #1650GalleryStudio #Photography #LAWomen

Native Narratives in Film & Books

Here are a list of 8 Contemporary Native Films to watch, and 8 Native books to read.

Support Indigenous / Native American narratives.

UCR “Indigenous Perspectives: Identity and Representation Through Media” May 14th, 2016

Join Kimberly Guerrero, Klee Benally, Pamela J. Peters, Steven P. Judd, Myrton Running Wolf, and Jim Ruel at UCR on Sat. May 14th – “Indigenous Perspectives: Identity and Representation Through Media.” Several workshops will discuss Indigenous portrayal through film, social justice, art, and photography along with Keynote speakers speaking about native people in the film industry today.

Colors of Humanity Art Gallery!

Truly honored that two images from our Legacy of Exiled NDNZ series was selected as part of the Colors of Humanity Art Gallery! Even more that one was NOTEWORTHY selected!

Occidental College – March 24th 2016

I’ll be speaking this Thursday at Occidental College addressing the historic U.S. policy of American Indian urban relocation and the visual, narrative imagery of American Indians in mass society – especially in the mecca of media – Hollywood!

Ocean of Life

“A REZ girl’s dream of seeing the ocean for the first time…”
The essence of the moon channels the waves of the deep blue sea…

Indian Woman in Harmony

A poem I wrote inspired by Maya Angelou. “This was inspired by a poem I read by Maya Angelou … I hope you like.”

I Crave you…

“This poem was inspire by my love of Pablo Neruda collect of Love Sonnets.”

Cheyenne Phoenix

University of Oregon

Not Your Romantic Indian: Indigenous Photography and the Legacy of Edward Curtis

Can’t find what you’re looking for? Use the search form to search the site.

Get new content delivered directly to your inbox.